Nominations Open: National Academies 2017 Communication Award | History of Science Society

ELIGIBILITYTo be considered for a 2017 Communication Award, the work should: be accessible and appeal to a broad, public audience; demonstrate clarity, creativity, originality, and accuracy; address issues and/or advances in science, engineering, and/or medicine; cover topics that have an impact on society; and have been published, broadcast, or released in 2016, in the United States and in English.

Source: Nominations Open: National Academies 2017 Communication Award | History of Science Society

Havnekrig i Odense: “Jeg føler en stor afmagt – kommunen stjæler vores arbejde”

Kurt Skov, topchef i Blue Water Shipping, har pudset Konkurrencestyrelsen på Odense Kommune. Han mener, at kommunen stjæler opgaver fra det privateEn havnekrig mellem Odense Kommune og det private shippingselskab Blue Water Shipping har kørt…

Source: Havnekrig i Odense: “Jeg føler en stor afmagt – kommunen stjæler vores arbejde”

Urbanization – United Nations Population Division | Department of Economic and Social Affairs

Themes Adolescents and Youth Ageing Environment Family Planning Fertility HIV/AIDS International Migration Marriage and Unions Mortality MDGs Population Policies Population Trends SDGs UrbanizationUrbanizationMore than one half of the world population lives now in urban areas, and virtually all countries of the world are becoming increasingly urbanized. This is a global phenomenon that has nonetheless very different expressions across regions and development levels: richer countries and those of Latin America and the Caribbean have already a large proportion of their population residing in urban areas, whereas Africa and Asia, still mostly rural, will urbanize faster than other regions over the coming decades. These trends are changing the landscape of human settlement, with significant implications for living conditions, the environment and development in different parts of the worldThe Population Division prepares every two years updated estimates and projections of the total and urban population for all countries or areas in the world, and has recently started to estimate further disaggregations of the urban and rural population by age and sex. The World Urbanization Prospects is a flagship publication of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

Source: Urbanization – United Nations Population Division | Department of Economic and Social Affairs

NEW REPORT ON REPLACEMENT MIGRATION ISSUED BY UN POPULATION DIVISION | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases

— The numbers of immigrants needed to prevent the decline of the total population are considerably larger than those envisioned by the United Nations projections. The only exception is the United States.– The numbers of immigrants needed to prevent declines in the working- age population are larger than those needed to prevent declines in total population. In some cases, such as the Republic of Korea, France, the United Kingdom or the United States, they are several times larger. If such flows were to occur, post-1995 immigrants and their descendants would represent a strikingly large share of the total population in 2050 — between 30 and 39 per cent in the case of Japan, Germany and Italy.– Relative to their population size, Italy and Germany would need the largest number of migrants to maintain the size of their working-age populations. Italy would require 6,500 migrants per million inhabitants annually and Germany, 6,000. The United States would require the smallest number — 1,300 migrants per million inhabitants per year.– The levels of migration needed to prevent population ageing are many times larger than the migration streams needed to prevent population decline. Maintaining potential support ratios would in all cases entail volumes of immigration entirely out of line with both past experience and reasonable expectations.– In the absence of immigration, the potential support ratios could be maintained at current levels by increasing the upper limit of the working-age population to roughly 75 years of age.– The new challenges of declining and ageing populations will require a comprehensive reassessment of many established policies and programmes, with a long-term perspective. Critical issues that need to be addressed include: (a) the appropriate ages for retirement; (b) the levels, types and nature of retirement and health care benefits for the elderly; (c) labour force participation; (d) the assessed amounts of contributions from workers and employers to support retirement and health care benefits for the elderly population; and (e) policies and programmes relating to international migration,

Source: NEW REPORT ON REPLACEMENT MIGRATION ISSUED BY UN POPULATION DIVISION | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases

UN Document From 2000 Exposes Global “Migration Replacement” Solution To Developed World Demographics | Zero Hedge

The levels of migration needed to prevent population ageing are many times larger than the migration streams needed to prevent population decline. Maintaining potential support ratios would in all cases entail volumes of immigration entirely out of line with both past experience and reasonable expectations. In the absence of immigration, the potential support ratios could be maintained at current levels by increasing the upper limit of the working-age population to roughly 75 years of age. The new challenges of declining and ageing populations will require a comprehensive reassessment of many established policies and programmes, with a long-term perspective. Critical issues that need to be addressed include: (a) the appropriate ages for retirement; (b) the levels, types and nature of retirement and health care benefits for the elderly; (c) labour force participation; (d) the assessed amounts of contributions from workers and employers to support retirement and health care benefits for the elderly population; and (e) policies and programmes relating to international migration, in particular, replacement migration and the integration of large numbers of recent migrants and their descendants.The problem with this cunning plan to immigrant-ize western nations to backfill the domestic demographic decline is that the immigrants – as a whole – are a drag on growth (via politically-correct benefits, extra policing, and border enforcements) as opposed to the economy-improving growth dynamos that the United Nations assumed any sentient-credit-consuming-being would be in the year 2000.

Source: UN Document From 2000 Exposes Global “Migration Replacement” Solution To Developed World Demographics | Zero Hedge

UN Document From 2000 Exposes Global “Migration Replacement” Solution To Developed World Demographics | Zero Hedge

Relative to their population size, Italy and Germany would need the largest number of migrants to maintain the size of their working-age populations. Italy would require 6,500 migrants per million inhabitants annually and Germany, 6,000.

Source: UN Document From 2000 Exposes Global “Migration Replacement” Solution To Developed World Demographics | Zero Hedge